Kevin interviews Auntie Doris

It’s me, Kevin, again.  Today I’m very honoured to be interviewing Auntie Doris.  She lives in a county called Kent which is where my Mummy’s Mummy came from.  It’s complicated.

Anyway, I asked Auntie Doris first off  “Who are your guinea pigs and what are their favourite things?” and she gave me a huge long list:

  • Neptune  – Being red
  • Roger (Flapjack) – Chilling
  • Brendan – Carrots
  • Summerboy – Auntie Debbie (Pig sitter)
  • Baldrick – Human huggies
  • Blackbird II – Hairless fwends
  • Orinoko – Not having cream put on
  • Toby – Eating with my fwend
  • Wally – Playing hide and seek – the hiding part
  • HB – Playing hide and seek – the seeking part
  • George – Corn and Fennell (not necessarily in that order!), boating.
  • Charlie – Sleeping next to my Daddy (George), boating.
  • Cappachino – Popcorning, hiding
  • Lucas-Buckmore – Standing on Cappa’s head
  • Dorkiss – being with my Mum and ¾ sister
  • Harrier – chilling (she is old)
  • Eden – Hanging out with the girls
  • Fern Popcorning in all directions
  • Starburst – Hiding from brushes on clean out day
  • Juno – Looking grumpy even though she isn’t
  • Cleo – Hairdressing
  • Nymrod – Lettuce
  • Xanadu – Sleeping
  • Maddison – Eva
  • Eva – Shows
  • Greta – Having the messiest hair ever

Continue reading “Kevin interviews Auntie Doris”

Advertisements

Kevin interviews Auntie Dawn (part 2)

Auntie Dawn told me such lovely stories about her pigs last month that I saved some for this month.

If you missed that you can read it here.

So, Auntie Dawn: What favourite memories do you have of your guinea pigs?

There are so many! I’ll confine myself to talking about how we got each of our departed pigs.

Saku was our first pig. One warm April afternoon, I left work early, and Uncle and I took a train out a place called Queens. We had seen an ad on the Internet in which a man said he was looking to rehome his daughter’s pig because his wife was allergic. We arrived at the appointed place, the parking lot of a bank, and waited. We didn’t have a cellphone at the time and thought we were in the wrong place. Eventually we figured out we were on the wrong side of the bank. Continue reading “Kevin interviews Auntie Dawn (part 2)”

Kevin interviews Auntie Dawn (part 1)

Kevin here again.  Today I’m interviewing Auntie Dawn, although she told me so much lovely stuff I’m putting it in two parts.  The next part will be at the start of next months, because Dylan doesn’t want me to hog his blog.

Auntie Dawn lives in New York which is a long way away from us, but we met her when she came to stay a couple of years ago.  Was it only last year?  It seems a very long time ago.  It was just after Victor went over the Rainbow Bridge, so it must have been last year.

The first thing I asked her was: who are your guinea pigs and what are their favourite things? Continue reading “Kevin interviews Auntie Dawn (part 1)”

Kevin interviews Auntie Janet

Hi, Kevin here.  After I got over my tummy trouble I sent some interview questions to Auntie Janet and this is what she said.  I know it’s not as clever as Dylan’s interview, but I hope you like it anyway.
Dear Kevin
These are our interview answers, I hope you like them! Firstly, you should know that I live in the San Francisco Bay area with my piggies, and I’m a stay-at-home slave to them.  I guess your mom is a stay-at-home writer-slave, isn’t she? Continue reading “Kevin interviews Auntie Janet”

Dylan interviews Mummy

I’m sitting here with Mummy, and she’s finished bribing me with cucumber, and she’s combed my hair (ouch!), and now I’m going to ask her some Very Difficult questions.

D: Who’s your favourite guinea pig.

M: Well, you are, of course, Dylan.  Although it might be whoever’s sitting on my lap at the time.  If Kevin reads this, he’ll see his name there, because I’ve put some magic into the computer.

D: I told you Mummy was tricksy, everyone, and that just proves it, doesn’t it!  What do you do when you go outside through the front door?

M: Well, most of the time I get in the car and go somewhere.  You’ve been in the car, so you know what that’s like.

D: Yes, but what do you do mostly?

M: Mostly I suppose I go to play golf, and most times when I play golf I come home past the shop and get you some veggies.  The big shop usually has food with the day’s date on special offer, and as you know, it’s always good for another week, not that it usually gets that far.  Someone (naming no names) eats it.

D: That would be Kevin, then.

M: Yes, Kevin is one of the eaters of veggies.  I know some people whose names begin with D that eat them too.  And wheek loudly when I come back in the house rustling bags.

D: We’re just welcoming you home.

M: Me and the bags of veggies, I think.

D: Well, yes.  I mean, they’re important.

M: You’re quite right.

D: Why do some veggies come in bags and some come from the garden?

M: It all depends on things like the time of year and whether you’ve already eaten everything nice for breakfast that was in the garden.  Shall I tell you about the ‘hungry gap’?

D: You’re not talking about my empty tummy, are you?

M: No, I’m talking about the time between about February and now when there’s not much in the way of food in the garden.  Up to February there are things like cabbages and kale, and if the ground isnt too frosty I’ll have some carrots and celeriac hiding under the fleece to keep, well, not frozen.  Then when those have gone there’s nothing grown big enough to eat in the garden until about now.  You’ve been getting salsify leaves for a month, and last week you had some herbs and some strawberry leaves, but if I take too many of those, the plants won’t grow well and we’ll go hungry later.  Then I’ll have to go to the shop for things we should have grown ourselves.

D: I like talking about food.  What else will we get from the garden soon?

M: Well, I planted out the lettuce and beans last week.  You might get a bean leaf each, once a week, since I reckon each plant can spare one a week without harming it for later.  The lettuce will grow quickly once they get going, and the radishes I sowed about three weeks ago will be ready to eat soon.

D: I don’t think I like radishes.

M: Kevin likes them.  They’re okay when they’re young.  They get a bit strong later, don’t they.  I don’t like them much when they’re strong either.  But they help the carrots and things grow.

D: CARROTS!!  When can we have carrots?

M: The ones I sowed in the autumn didn’t grow very well, but there are a few that might be worth eating in a week or so.  There are lots more I’ve sowed each month since March, so hopefully you’ll be eating them by the end of June.

D: That sounds lovely.  One more question?

M: OK.

D: Why does it always rain on days we want to go out and eat grass?

M: I don’t know, Dyl, but if you can stop it but still make sure we have enough rain for the plants to grow, just fix it, okay?

D: OK, Mummy, I’ll do that.  Thank you very much for being the first person we’ve interviewed.